Tag Archives: sculpture

Carving the Boar

Over the last 4 months, I have been used the boar head model I sculpted in Berlin to carve the final version in stone. Here are the pictures from that process. Since the early stages aren’t really that interesting to look at, I will start with what the carving looked like about 6 weeks into the carving. Bear in mind I started from a solid block.

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image
boarandme
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The last photos are after around 3 months of work. We are still waiting on a final template for the background and in the end the background will be pitched stone and in some kind of an oval shape.

Mold Making

photo by Katherin York

photo by Katherine York

photo by Katherine York

photo by Katherine York

photo by Katherine York

Thanks so much to Katherine York for helping out with the process and documentation! Check out her beautiful photos linked above.

 

Elephant Clay Model: Finshed

 

 

The smoke in the photos is not for effect, it is for keeping mosquitos away. So far, no malaria!

 

 

Elephant Sculpture on Koh Chang: updates

More updates!

 

 

 

Elephant Sculpture on Koh Chang: progress photos

Here’s an update on the elephant sculpture. Not finished yet, but getting there!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Magic! These are just progress photos, the model should really start shaping up when I go back and visit the real thing! Her name is Churi.

 

Studio Place Arts in Barre, Vermont

I completely forgot to do a post on this!

The two stone pieces that I did this past summer are up right now at SPA in Barre, Vermont.

http://www.studioplacearts.com/

Go see Barre’s finest while you still can. Exhibition comes down at the end of October.

RSP/Damstuhltrager Studio Week 2

After a month back in Berlin, I was given the extreme privilege of taking over the downstairs at Rockelmann Stuhltrager Projects for a 2 month residency. The first week I moved all relevant materials into the space, and by now I have started a few drawings and busted out some smaller ideas that I have been wanting to do for a while.

Here are photos of the space.

The space is plenty of room to make big drawings, a few clay pieces, and some smaller casts that I a working on. For the past week I have been trying out a faux bronze patina on polyurethane casts. Eventually, I would like to do larger pieces with this technique but for now these are fun experiments.

There are larger drawings and clay pieces going on, but they are in the beginning phases.

Stone Works am Ende

After three months back home in Vermont, I am back in Berlin. I’ll be picking up where I left off, doing more with Johnen Gallerie and assisting artist Olaf Holzapfel.

Here are the final photos of my two stone sculptures I did while at home. Remember folks, this was just practice.

Also, I worked on the Julius Caesar profile portrait a little more. Here is the final photos of that piece. Thanks to my friends at the online Sculpture Community , I found out who sculpted the original. The cast was of a carving done in 15th century Florence, by Desiderio da Settignano. The depiction is of Julius Caesar, and was sculpted in 1460.

So! Those were my two first carvings that I did this past summer. More to come, in the coming years. For now, back to drawing and pastel.. Thanks so much to Jerry for taking the photos and editing them after I left home–again.

Voltaire Continued

Once you’ve done all the roughing out with black granite, then you really start to appreciate the detail that you can get with this stone. The grain is really fine, and the dense stone is really strong, allowing you to use smaller and smaller chisels for fine detail. I have just started to punch in the eyes, and will be finishing those up, and trying to get the finer wrinkles around the eyes and mouth.

As you can see, I am working from photos at this point and trying to take my sculpture farther than the cast that I used to rough the face out. There are multiple versions of Voltaire done by Houdon, depicting him bald, and with a headband and wig. I am doing the version with the headband, but trying to go after the detail of the marble carving.

At this point, drawing on the stone is important, and more enjoyable than it is during the earlier phases. Through constant drawing and re-drawing, you eventually achieve the level of detail desired. I’ve added 4 new chisels to the mix, and may invent a few of my own as I progress.

Voltaire Case Study

In this post I will show you the phases of a pointed stone carving start to finish. Of course, I’m not showing all the tools I am using at each phase, but some things are just tricks of the trade and will remain a mystery… unless you want to come to Vermont and see for yourself!

The photo shows the initial cuts in the stone, and the first few points made from the original.

Here, I’ve cleared away a lot of the stone between points and started to go after some of the details.

At this point, I would say the piece is “roughed out”, and I am ready to start going after the details.

After roughing the piece out, I begin to become more systematic and go after sections of the face. I’ve started with the mouth, and I will move my way up the face, and then begin to push farther back to get some of the jaw line and the ears. For the finished piece, I would like to create an effect that the face has emerged out of a rough piece of stone, and leave marks from each phase.

True Blood

After a few grueling weeks hunched over this granite block, I’ve come out with something that I would call finished. We’re still not sure who from history is depicted here, so if anything screams out at you let me know.

For my next sculpture, I will be doing a full size portrait of Voltaire. Through reliable sources I obtained a copy of the original sculpture done by Jean-Antoine Houdon, which sits in Montpellier, France.

This week thing got off to a rough start. Unlike Houdon, my sculpture will be carved out of South African black granite, which I like to call, Unabtainium (it was a toss up between Unabtainium and Kryptonite, you decide which is funnier). South African black has turned out to be not only extremely hard, requiring me to swing the hammer a little harder each time I need to break something off, but as sharp as broken glass when it splits. Oh, I’ve had my fair share of missed swings, but this week was brutal. This may not look like much, but bare in mind this is after 3 missed swings at full speed with a 8lb sledge.

It’s puffier than a muffin top.

5 minutes of grunting, stamping, and teeth grinding later, I found out just how sharp this stone is.

Being something of a fatalist, I decided that life was trying to tell me something. Just moments before this photo was taken there was literally blood pouring down my face. Kind of like that scene from The Fifth Element when Zorg is talking to the darkness… The piece of stone hit me directly in the middle of my forehead, right in my third eye. I immediately looked up what a bindi represents on wikipedia. Apparently, the bindi represents concealed wisdom, and strengthens concentration. The bindi is placed on the site of the sixth Chakra called, Ajna.

It was like an ironic epiphany to start bleeding out of my mind’s eye and I do feel a bit wiser and definitely more focused…

Profile/Recent Work

For my first piece this summer I will copy a roman relief carving of… a senator. If you can tell who it it from the picture please let me know. We have the plaster cast in the shop and I figured it would be good practice to get started. I’ve been doing all the with with a pointing machine and things are going pretty smoothly.

Eagle Installation

So I’ve been back in Vermont for about 3 weeks now. Since I’ve been back I went down to East Hartford, Connecticut with Jerry for an installation of one of his most recently finished pieces. The eagle monument was a historical restoration job. The original was carved out of brownstone just after the civil war.

Job well done!

Buda

I finally got some decent pictures from the exhibition in Budapest. The cars look great, and Hajnal will have them on display at the Kiscelli Museum until the and of May. All in all, it was a great trip and I really love the city.

The room where the full size car is installed is HUGE. It used to be a cathedral and the sound is amazing. It was great to finally see the car I was modelling in real life! I think I did okay working just from photos, but mine turned out to be a little more sporty than the real life version.

It snowed on the day of the exhibition, but we spent most of the day at the outdoor thermal baths with little snow flakes falling on our heads and creating a massive fog cloud over the pool. That was a great day. The picture really doesn’t do a justice, but here’s one.

Just imagine looking for your girlfriend in the fog, and getting a big handful of fat hairy Hungarian man instead… “Hellllooo you…OH GOD! I mean, excuse me!”

The End

Giessen, Schleifen, Sprühen

The finishing touches.

DONE.

The exhibition is tomorrow night at the Kiscelli Museum in the Buda side of town. The space is huge, and I will have photos of the final installation soon.

Many thanks to Hajnal Nemeth for giving me the opportunity to collaborate on this project, and organizing such a great show!